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A New Era in Thalassemia Disorder: An Overview

Abstract

G.Madhu Latha1*, Sk.Suhana1, Sk.Sahera Raksha1, B.Sai Spandana1, S.Radhika2, N.Rama Rao3

Alpha thalassemia is a blood disorder that reduces the production of hemoglobin. Haemoglobin is the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to cells throughout the body. A hemoglobin molecule has sub-units commonly referred to as alpha and beta. Both sub-units are necessary to bind oxygen in the lungs properly and deliver it to tissues in other parts of the body. The alpha chain is an important component of fetal hemoglobin (which is usually made before birth) and hemoglobin A and hemoglobin A2 (which are present after birth). Beta thalassemia is a fairly common blood disorder worldwide. Thousands of infants with beta thalassemia are born each year. Beta thalassemia occurs most frequently in people from Mediterranean countries, North Africa, the Middle East, India, Central Asia, and Southeast Asia. Thalassemia occurs when there is an abnormality or mutation in one of the genes involved in hemoglobin production. A physical exam may reveal a swollen (enlarged) spleen. Treatment for thalassemia major often involves regular blood transfusions and folate supplements. Untreated, thalassemia major leads to heart failure and liver problems, and makes a person more likely to develop infections.Avoid excess iron. Unless doctor recommends it, don't take vitamins or other supplements that contain iron. Eating a balanced diet that contains plenty of nutritious foods can help you feel better and boost your energy. Signs and symptoms are usually mild with thalassemia minor and little, if any, treatment is needed. Occasionally, you may need a blood transfusion, particularly after surgery, after having a baby or to help manage thalassemia complications.

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